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Classical - Released January 1, 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg

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Classical - Released November 18, 2010 | Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg

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Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg

Booklet Distinctions Choc du Monde de la Musique - 9 de Classica-Répertoire
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Classical - Released October 18, 2010 | Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg

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Classical - Released January 1, 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg

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Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg

Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg

Love, like great musicianship, is not something that just happens. Sure, love at first sight is common enough. But love at first sight is comparatively easy; love over the long haul is much harder and must be nurtured. In this collection called Reflection, pianist Hélène Grimaud couples four works by three composers, and by their coupling and her performances, she attempts to persuade listeners that a folie d'amour is at the root of the music. The folie d'amour is a question that may -- or may not, scholars are divided and evidence is lacking -- have been shared by Robert Schumann, his wife Clara Schumann, and the youthful Johannes Brahms, and the works in question are the Piano Concerto by Robert, two songs by Clara, and the E minor Cello Sonata plus Two Rhapsodies by Brahms. But while there's no doubting the intensity of Grimaud's fervor, there's no believing that it'll be long lasting. With Esa-Pekka Salonen leading the Staatskapelle Dresden, Grimaud throws herself into Robert's concerto, ripping into the opening Allegro affetuoso's cadenza with palpable passion. But her attention seems to wander during the central Andantino grazioso and all that's left by the closing Allegro vivace is a race to the double bars. With mezzo-soprano Anne Sofie von Otter, Grimaud hurls herself into the accompaniment of Clara's songs, but von Otter's consummate control and supreme artistry make Grimaud's heaving and sighing seem superficial. With cellist Truls Mørk, Grimaud sounds committed to a partnership in Brahms' sonata, but while the two performers are sometimes astoundingly together, they are more often interpretively so far apart as to be barely playing the same piece. Alone at last in the Two Rhapsodies, Grimaud seems intense but willful and easily distracted. While one cannot complain about her warm tone, her strong technique, or her emotional interpretations, one cannot deny the strong sense that Grimaud's heart and mind are already onto something else. DG's sound is different for each performance -- a bit distant in the concerto, a tad close in the songs, a little blurred in the sonata, and a lot too loud in the Rhapsodies -- but it is always resolutely focused on Grimaud.

Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg

Hélène Grimaud is almost impossibly beautiful, impossibly talented, impossibly demanding, and impossibly willful. She's wonderful but she's exhausting, and long before it's over the listener finds out that she's not worth the energy. On this disc coupling Chopin's Sonata in B flat minor with Rachmaninov's Sonata in B flat minor plus Chopin's Berceuse and Barcarolle, Grimaud demonstrates once again why she's la belle noiseuse of pianists. Her Chopin Sonata is incredibly brilliant and unbelievably sensual, but an emotional mess. Grimaud speeds up into climaxes, unable to resist getting there first, and slows down at codas, unwilling to let go after it's over. Grimaud pulls back and pushes ahead for no special reason except to show that she can if she wants to. Her Rachmaninov Sonata is staggeringly well-played and stunningly over-acted. Grimaud can handle anything the score throws at her but with her imperious technique and aggressive interpretation, she winds up doing what even Horowitz could not do: she bullies the music into frightened submission. Her Chopin Berceuse and Barcarolle start sweet and tender and kind and loving, but end up too hard, too harsh, too tough, and too fast. Grimaud will drive most listeners crazy. Whether they enjoy it is up to them. Deutsche Grammophon's sound is very clear but edgy when loud.

Keyboard Concertos - Released January 1, 2007 | Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg

Solo Piano - Released January 1, 2005 | Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg

Classical - Released November 11, 2009 | Denon

Classical - Released January 24, 2006 | Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg

Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg

Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg

Credo by Hélène Grimaud is one of the most effectively sequenced discs ever released. The movement from the hazy postmodernism of John Corigliano's Fantasia on an Ostinato for solo piano and the passionate Romanticism of Beethoven's Tempest Sonata for solo piano, then on through the Enlightenment ecstasy of Beethoven's Choral Fantasia for piano solo, orchestra, and chorus, and culminating in the nihilist excesses of Arvo Pärt's massive Credo for piano solo, orchestra, and chorus, is musically and dramatically overwhelming. Individually, the effectiveness of her performances is debatable. Is her Corigliano Fantasia melancholy and pensive or slightly narcissistic? Is her Beethoven Tempest individualistically radical or almost eccentric? Is her Beethoven Choral Fantasia with Esa-Pekka Salonen and the Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra and Swedish Radio Choir brilliantly postmodern or just strange? And is Grimaud and Salonen's Pärt Credo anything but a metaphor for life itself: mostly boring, sometimes unbearable, and occasionally very beautiful? Taken all together as a single aesthetic act, Grimaud's Credo is nevertheless completely compelling while it's happening, and what more can one ask of a work of art? Deutsche Grammophon's sound has never been more translucent and immediate.

Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg

Booklet