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Rock - Released October 25, 2010 | Parlophone UK

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography

Rock - Released June 19, 1995 | Parlophone UK

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
After satisfying all of their classical music kinks with keyboard player Jon Lord's overblown Concerto for Group and Orchestra, Deep Purple's soon to be classic Mark II version made its proper debut and established the sonic blueprint that would immortalize this lineup of the band on 1970's awesome In Rock. The cacophony of sound (spearheaded by Ritchie Blackmore's blistering guitar solo) introducing opener "Speed King" made it immediately obvious that the band was no longer fooling around, but the slightly less intense "Bloodsucker" did afford stunned listeners a chance to catch their breaths before the band launched into the album's epic, ten-minute tour de force, "Child in Time." In what still stands as arguably his single greatest performance, singer Ian Gillan led his bandmates on a series of hypnotizing crescendos, from the song's gentle beginning through to its ear-shattering climax and then back again for an even more intense encore that brought the original vinyl album's seismic first side to a close. Side two opened with the searing power chords of "Flight of the Rat" -- another example of the band's new take-no-prisoners hard rock stance, though at nearly eight minutes, it too found room for some extended soloing from Blackmore and Lord. Next, "Into the Fire" and "Living Wreck" proved more concise but equally appealing, and though closer "Hard Lovin' Man" finally saw the new-look Deep Purple waffling on a bit too long before descending into feedback, the die was cast for one of heavy metal's defining albums. ~ Eduardo Rivadavia
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Metal - Released June 1, 1970 | Rhino

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography

Metal - Released October 12, 2012 | Parlophone Catalogue

Led Zeppelin's fourth album, Black Sabbath's Paranoid, and Deep Purple's Machine Head have stood the test of time as the Holy Trinity of English hard rock and heavy metal, serving as the fundamental blueprints followed by virtually every heavy rock & roll band since the early '70s. And, though it is probably the least celebrated of the three, Machine Head contains the "mother of all guitar riffs" -- and one of the first learned by every beginning guitarist -- in "Smoke on the Water." Inspired by real-life events in Montreux, Switzerland, where Deep Purple were recording the album when the Montreux Casino was burned to the ground during a Frank Zappa concert, neither the song, nor its timeless riff, should need any further description. However, Machine Head was anything but a one-trick pony, introducing the bona fide classic opener "Highway Star," which epitomized all of Deep Purple's intensity and versatility while featuring perhaps the greatest soloing duel ever between guitarist Ritchie Blackmore and organist Jon Lord. Also in top form was singer Ian Gillan, who crooned and exploded with amazing power and range throughout to establish himself once and for all as one of the finest voices of his generation, bar none. Yes, the plodding shuffle of "Maybe I'm a Leo" shows some signs of age, but punchy singles "Pictures of Home" and "Never Before" remain as vital as ever, displaying Purple at their melodic best. And finally, the spectacular "Space Truckin'" drove Machine Head home with yet another tremendous Blackmore riff, providing a fitting conclusion to one of the essential hard rock albums of all time. ~ Eduardo Rivadavia

Pop/Rock - Released October 22, 2010 | Parlophone Catalogue

When Ritchie Blackmore departed Deep Purple in the mid-'70s and formed Rainbow (which featured Ronnie James Dio), his replacement was Tommy Bolin. To be sure, Blackmore was a darn tough act to follow, but Bolin proved himself to be a fine guitarist in his own right on Come Taste the Band, his first album with Deep Purple. But unfortunately, Bolin didn't have exceptional material to work with -- decent and likable, but hardly exceptional. While sweaty yet melodic cuts like "Dealer," "Lady Luck," and "You Keep on Moving" are far from bad, nothing here is in a class with "Smoke on the Water" or "Highway Star." Deep Purple's more hardcore devotees will want this album, though it's far from the best representation of their '70s work. ~ Alex Henderson

Pop/Rock - Released March 3, 2003 | Capitol Records

Pop/Rock - Released March 3, 2003 | Parlophone Catalogue

Led Zeppelin's fourth album, Black Sabbath's Paranoid, and Deep Purple's Machine Head have stood the test of time as the Holy Trinity of English hard rock and heavy metal, serving as the fundamental blueprints followed by virtually every heavy rock & roll band since the early '70s. And, though it is probably the least celebrated of the three, Machine Head contains the "mother of all guitar riffs" -- and one of the first learned by every beginning guitarist -- in "Smoke on the Water." Inspired by real-life events in Montreux, Switzerland, where Deep Purple were recording the album when the Montreux Casino was burned to the ground during a Frank Zappa concert, neither the song, nor its timeless riff, should need any further description. However, Machine Head was anything but a one-trick pony, introducing the bona fide classic opener "Highway Star," which epitomized all of Deep Purple's intensity and versatility while featuring perhaps the greatest soloing duel ever between guitarist Ritchie Blackmore and organist Jon Lord. Also in top form was singer Ian Gillan, who crooned and exploded with amazing power and range throughout to establish himself once and for all as one of the finest voices of his generation, bar none. Yes, the plodding shuffle of "Maybe I'm a Leo" shows some signs of age, but punchy singles "Pictures of Home" and "Never Before" remain as vital as ever, displaying Purple at their melodic best. And finally, the spectacular "Space Truckin'" drove Machine Head home with yet another tremendous Blackmore riff, providing a fitting conclusion to one of the essential hard rock albums of all time. ~ Eduardo Rivadavia

Rock - Released September 28, 1998 | Parlophone UK

Pop/Rock - Released February 23, 2009 | Parlophone Catalogue

Stormbringer falls short of the excellence of Machine Head and Who Do We Think We Are, but nonetheless boasts some definite classics -- including the fiery "Lady Double Dealer," the ominous title song (a goth metal treasure), the sweaty "High Ball Shooter," and the melancholy ballad "Soldier of Fortune." Most of the other songs on the decent, if uneven, Stormbringer (which Metal Blade reissued on CD in the early '90s) are not essential. Like Come Taste the Band, Stormbringer will be of interest to Deep Purple's more enthusiastic fans, rather than casual listeners who would be much better off starting out with either of the above-mentioned studio projects or the live Made in Japan. ~ Alex Henderson

Pop/Rock - Released March 3, 2003 | EMI Records

This Special Edition three-CD set features the three 1972 concert recordings from which the classic Made in Japan album was selected, remixed, and remastered. It's almost complete -- a few encores and two songs from Made in Japan had to be left off, as the remaining tracks clock in at over 230 minutes. Deep Purple played almost exactly the same set each night, so there's a lot of duplication here, but they're in fantastic form throughout most of the performances. The second show, over half of which did make it onto Made in Japan, burns brilliantly and white hot from start to finish, and there are other new highlights as well, including the wailing encore "Black Night." Only you can decide if you need three 20-minute versions of "Space Truckin'," but for fans this is a valuable set -- not only for comparative listening (Jon Lord never plays the intro to "Child in Time" the same way twice), but also for presenting more of the band at and near the height of its powers. This is another fine set released through the efforts of the Deep Purple Appreciation Society, who also provide the excellent liner notes and packaging. ~ Stephen Raiteri

Rock - Released April 5, 2010 | Parlophone UK

The first made-for-compact disc Deep Purple collection, Anthology still offers a satisfying, extended glimpse at the seminal English hard rockers without the extra fat (meaning the rare outtakes) of the comprehensive Shades quadruple box set. And despite Anthology's mid-70's cutoff date (all material from the '80s and '90s albums by the re-formed Mark II lineup, and various incarnations thereof are ignored) surprisingly little essential material is omitted from this set. Five tracks from the mostly forgotten Mark I lineup make the cut, including the group's first charting single "Hush," but are quickly and summarily eclipsed by the arrival of Gillan & Glover on such timeless classics as "Black Night," "Child in Time," "Strange Kind of Woman," "Highway Star," etc. Curiously, the ubiquitous "Smoke on the Water" is featured here in its Made in Japan live version, rather than the studio original -- a decision which may upset some consumers. Finally, ten mostly well-picked examples of the David Coverdale-fronted Mark III formation bring the set to a close; with special kudos going to a monstrous 12-minute live rendition of the classic "Mistreated." ~ Eduardo Rivadavia

Metal - Released June 17, 2005 | Parlophone UK

As part of EMI's Platinum Collection series, Deep Purple are featured on previously released tracks taken from the heavy metal band's stint with Warner Bros. in the late '60s through 2003. Among the 41 tracks are the original versions of "Smoke on the Water," "Woman from Tokyo," "Kentucky Woman," and "Hush." ~ Al Campbell

Pop/Rock - Released March 1, 2003 | Parlophone Catalogue

Deep Purple had kicked off the '70s with a new lineup and a string of brilliant albums that quickly established them (along with fellow British giants Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath) as a major force in the popularization of hard rock and heavy metal. All the while, their reputation as one of the decade's fiercest live units complemented this body of work and earned them almost instant legendary status. But with 1973's disappointing Who Do We Think We Are -- the fourth and final studio outing by the original run of Purple's classic Mark II lineup -- all the fire and inspiration that had made the previous year's Machine Head their greatest triumph mysteriously vanished from sight. Vastly inferior to all three of its famous predecessors, the album revealed an exhausted band clearly splintering at the seams. Except for opener "Woman From Tokyo," which hinted at glories past with its signature Ritchie Blackmore riff, the album's remaining cuts are wildly inconsistent and find the band simply going through the motions. In fact, many of these don't so much resemble songs as loose jam sessions quickly thrown together in the studio with varying degrees of enthusiasm. "Mary Long" and "Super Trouper" are prime examples, featuring generic solos from Blackmore and organist Jon Lord, and uncharacteristically inane lyrics from soon-to-be former singer Ian Gillan. With its start-stop rhythm and Gillan's fine scat singing, the energetic "Rat Bat Blue" is a memorable exception to the rule, but the yawn-inducing blues of "Place in the Line" and the gospel mediocrity of "Our Lady" bring the album to a close with a whimper rather than a shout. [A painfully revealing display of a legendary band grinding to a halt, Who Do We Think We Are was reissued in 2000 with the added incentive of seven bonus tracks and new liner notes by bassist Roger Glover]. ~ Eduardo Rivadavia

Pop/Rock - Released September 4, 1996 | CMC International Records

Twenty-eight years after the band's inception, Deep Purple venture into the most adventurous album of their storied career. With guitar virtuoso Steve Morse, of ex-Dixie Dregs and Kansas fame, replacing the legendary Ritchie Blackmore (his second departure from the band), fans get the breadth of Morse's influences. The scope of the music goes into uncharted beats like the finger-snapping "Hey Ciso" and "Rosa's Cantina," and the acoustic-flavored Scottish highlander feel of "The Aviator." "Sometimes I Feel Like Screaming" is one of their best songs in years, beginning with a soft acoustic intro before being rocked up to the turbo-charged chorus full of lyrical wit. "A Touch Away" introduces fans to the band's first true ballad, a lovely piece of acoustic summertime fare. ~ Glen Miller

Rock - Released September 9, 2011 | Parlophone UK

Essential in this case means Deep Purple Mark II, with Ian Gillan and Ritchie Blackmore as the helm of one of rock's greatest dinosaurs from 1970 to 1974. Dinosaur is usually meant in the worst possible way when referring to a rock band, but in the case of Deep Purple it could only be a compliment. This isn't a dinosaur in the stuffy Paleolithic, Latin genus sense, but a massive lumbering destructive force of energy in the Jurassic Park sense. Every inch of these songs stomps out a massive clawed footprint in the brain. If the track listing looks familiar, it is; Essential is a European import that repackages one of the best DP collections around, 24 Carat Purple. What it adds is the relatively new Copy Control technology, which is supposed to prevent file sharing and other threats to the rights of the music contained on the disc without preventing anyone from actually playing the disc. Oh, if only it were true. Let the buyer beware: Essential is a great collection but on budget equipment, such as some portable CD players, its sleek digital advances may make listeners pine for a pre-digital-paranoia version. ~ Wade Kergan