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Albums

Symphonic Music - Released July 1, 2013 | Les Indispensables de Diapason

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or

Classical - Released November 28, 2005 | Warner Classics

Distinctions Diapason d'or

Classical - Released January 1, 2008 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 9 de Classica-Répertoire

Violin Concertos - Released February 27, 2007 | Naxos

Booklet Distinctions 9 de Classica-Répertoire

Classical - Released August 1, 2004 | Warner Classics

Distinctions Diapason d'or
While it is true that violinist David Oistrakh made earlier recordings of Prokofiev's Violin Concertos in the USSR, for most Westerners his '50s recordings of the works made in London were their first introduction to Oistrakh's Prokofiev Concertos. And what an introduction it is: although there had been superb recordings of the Concertos before Oistrakh -- one thinks immediately of the exquisite Heifetz/Barbirolli recordings -- these recordings are far and away the most soulful, the most lyrical, the most heartfelt, and certainly the most persuasive recordings of the works that had ever been recorded. And half a century later, Oistrakh's Prokofiev Concertos are still the most persuasive recordings ever made. Oistrakh's strong, singing tone, his incomparable virtuosity, his thorough understanding of the music, and his ability to make every note carry the full weight of meaning has yet to be surpassed despite decades of superb performances. Coupling Oistrakh's Concertos with Oistrakh's wonderfully expansive and thoroughly concentrated 1956 recording of Prokofiev's glorious Violin Sonata No. 2 only makes this reissue more appealing. And EMI's remastered mono and stereo sound is almost as rich and warm and clear as the best recordings made in the past half century.

Classical - Released August 4, 2008 | Warner Classics

Booklet

Classical - Released January 1, 2002 | Decca

Could an LP ever have sounded this good? It seems hard to believe. How could the sound from a piece of plastic carved with a single circular groove possibly be as warm, as deep, as clear, and as true as the sound from this CD? Yet it must be so, for surely no piece of plastic inscribed with gazillions of zeros-and-ones could somehow contrive to improve on the 1962 Decca Kingsway Hall original recorded on half-inch analogue tape at 15 inches per second by producer Erik Smith and engineer Kenneth Wilkinson? Thus, this 2006 JVC remastering produced by Winston Ma and engineered by Paul Stubblebine cannot really be an improvement on the original -- can it? If this disc coupling David Oistrakh's magical and magisterial performances of Bruch's Scottish Fantasia and Hindemith's Violin Concerto is no better than a pristine copy of the original Decca LP, we'll never know, but as things stand, this disc is as close to ideal as is imaginable. Listen just to the last few bars of the Introduction to Bruch's Fantasia -- the physical sense of Oistrakh's ineffably beautiful tone is palpable. The performances themselves are superlative -- Jascha Horenstein leads the London Symphony in a detailed accompaniment for Oistrakh's expressive performance of Bruch's Fantasia, and Paul Hindemith himself leads the LSO in an aggressive accompaniment for Oistrakh's muscular performance of his own concerto -- but anyone with the slightest interest in the art of recording and remastering owes it to themselves to hear this disc.

Concertos - Released January 1, 1962 | Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg

Classical - Released October 1, 2007 | Naxos Classical Archives

Classical - Released January 1, 2000 | Naxos Classical Archives

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Classical - Released January 1, 1959 | BNF Collection

Hi-Res Booklet

Classical - Released January 1, 2000 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

£1.99
£1.99

Classical - Released January 1, 1961 | BNF Collection

Hi-Res Booklet