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Classical - Released January 1, 2011 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason

Classical - Released April 20, 2015 | Universal Music GmbH

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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£6.75£11.56

Classical - Released January 1, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
The subject matter of this collection of classic music from (mostly) Hollywood seems a major departure from violinist Daniel Hope's previous focus on music contending with the Nazi cultural orbit, but actually it's a logical step: a great deal of Hollywood film music was composed by refugees from Germany, and the stylistic world they created continues to resonate today. There are several good recordings of this repertory by young violinists, but Hope's stands out. Partly it's because Hope's big, richly sentimental sound fits this repertory well. Partly it's because he varies the program effectively with the full Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 35, of Erich Korngold, and an appearance by none other than Sting in Hanns Eisler's The Secret Marriage, while still finding the core that connects all these pieces. Partly it's that Hope finds some unusual things that connect with the rest of the program: a couple of German film scores from the early 1930s, and the German melody better known as As Time Goes By, from the film Casablanca. And partly it's the variety and sequence of arrangements running from Jascha Heifetz down to the present day. The result is a fine outing that will satisfy anyone in the mood for big film themes, but also those who are seriously interested in film music.

Classical - Released January 1, 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Concertos - Released February 1, 2006 | Warner Classics International

Classical - Released May 1, 2009 | Warner Classics International

Classical - Released March 3, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
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Classical - Released March 3, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
Following up on his successful Vivaldi Recomposed album, English violinist Daniel Hope offers a new take on Vivaldi's Four Seasons that's not as outwardly experimental, but certainly equally novel. After an attractive, but not pathbreaking, set of the Four Seasons themselves, you get 12 pieces, each corresponding to one month of the year, plus a short Brahms encore. The connections of these pieces to their specific months may be pretty tenuous (February, an excerpt from Rameau's Les Indes galantes, is the most tenuous), but there's an X factor of sheer adventurousness in the album's favor. Hope moves from traditional repertory (Tchaikovsky, Schumann) to Amazing Grace (in an odd, electric rock arrangement), Max Richter from the earlier Vivaldi album, and the electronic musicians Aphex Twin and Chilly Gonzales (with one work by the latter, Les doutes d'août, recorded here for the first time). It testifies to the strength of Hope's musical personality that, although he's in no way a self-aggrandizing player, all this music hangs together and for the most part serves its intended function. This is the kind of album that one can imagine would appeal to listeners with little background in classical music, who don't distinguish rigidly between what's classical music and what isn't. Recommended for crossover audiences.

Classical - Released February 24, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Classical - Released February 17, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Classical - Released February 10, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Classical - Released February 3, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Classical - Released July 8, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet

Classical - Released February 5, 2016 | Universal Music GmbH

Booklet
£9.08£15.56
£6.75£11.56

Classical - Released February 5, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
The classical tribute album can be a turgid affair, but not in the case of this tribute to Yehudi Menuhin by violinist Daniel Hope. Hope was Menuhin's protégé from an early age, and he absorbed his mentor's soaring, almost spiritual tone. Better than that, My Tribute to Yehudi Menuhin captures the exceptionally wide range of Menuhin's musical interests, which in the latter part of his career took him from jazz to Indian music to pop and beyond. Unlike many other virtuosos at the top level, Menuhin was often on the forefront of new musical developments. He revived the lost Violin Concerto in D minor of the 13-year-old Mendelssohn, recording it three times, and Hope's performance effectively captures Menuhin's brilliant way with the finale. In the age of ubiquitous Vivaldi it's hard to remember that he was once a novelty, especially for a top-level player, and Hope's performance of the Concerto for two violins and strings, RV 522 (Simos Papanas is the second soloist) draws on how Vivaldi was performed in the 1950s. There is music by Bartók, to whom Menuhin was close, and by Steve Reich, commissioned (remarkably) by Menuhin and Edna Mitchell. Hope does not stick exclusively to Menuhin's repertoire; Bechara El Khoury's Unfinished Journey for violin and strings is an original commission by Hope, but it seems likely that Menuhin would have enjoyed it. This is a tribute that exudes real familiarity and warmth.