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Alternative & Indie - Released July 28, 2017 | Caroline Distribution

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 10, 2017 | Caroline Distribution

Zombies on Broadway is Andrew McMahon's second album as Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness -- a moniker he adopted in 2014, but he has effectively been a solo act since he developed Jack's Mannequin in 2004. Some 13 years later, McMahon remains faithful to the overblown melodicism he pioneered in Something Corporate, but Zombies on Broadway, like 2014's Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness before it, shows that the singer/songwriter is happy to adapt to the times. Echoes of Fun. can be heard throughout the album, particularly whenever the percussion pounds alongside endless layers of harmonies, and he's dabbling with vocoders and other electronics. Even so, McMahon is dedicated to carefully constructed melodies and earnest emotional blood-spilling. As always, the tension and pleasure within McMahon is that gulf between his sincerity -- with his plaintive, keening voice, he seems to mean every feeling he sings -- and his candied music. On Zombies on Broadway, there's an even greater emphasis on disco, electropop, and other pop styles that are generally dismissed as frivolous -- "Brooklyn, You're Killing Me" and "Shot Out of a Canyon" are both high-grade dance-pop -- and its gleaming surface feels shinier than previous McMahon productions, but rather than seeming like an attempt to chase trends, these inflections and accents feel like a culmination of craft. McMahon has long understood how to craft a song, and Zombies on Broadway proves he has the studio skills to match. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 25, 2015 | Caroline Distribution

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 11, 2015 | Concord Records

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Pop - Released October 14, 2014 | Universal Music

The eponymous debut album from the Jack’s Mannequin and Something Corporate mastermind under the Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness moniker, McMahon taps into his more commercial sensibilities and pulls out a ten-track set of Fun.-, Killers-, and Passion Pit-inspired pop confections that are as effortlessly breezy and melodic as they are steeped in carefully constructed melodrama. Opener "Canyon Moon" sets the tone with a punchy, Twin Peaks-ian tale of a lost girl that sounds like Coldplay distilled through the fat, foamy, factory-provided headphones that used to accompany the yellow Sony Sports Walkman -- there is a distinct, overly-serious, yet oddly comforting retro mid--80s vibe at work here that more or less permeates the entire album -- but McMahon saves the real earworm for the second course; "Cecilia and the Satellite," with its tried and true romantic grandstanding and big, Bastille-inspired group vocals, seems destined for a run of similarly themed movie trailers, and it helps to propel the listener through lesser, though by no means dreadful, cuts like "High Dive" and the sad-sack "See Her on the Weekend." McMahon's spot-on, self-effacing lyrics fit right in with the post-emo millennial overshare persuasion, and his penchant for on-the-nose phrasing and big pop moments would be grating if those instincts weren't so sharply honed and the sugary results so immaculately delivered. He may be in the wilderness emotionally, but his songs reside firmly beneath the bright lights of the city, where love, death, laughter, and heartache are most likely to fester. ~ James Christopher Monger
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 23, 2014 | Universal Music

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 23, 2014 | Universal Music

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Alternative & Indie - Released September 2, 2014 | Universal Music

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 12, 2014 | Caroline Distribution