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Jazz - Released February 7, 2012 | Jazz Village

Booklet Distinctions Sélection Les Inrocks - Indispensable JAZZ NEWS - Sélectionné par Ecoutez Voir
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Jazz - Released September 9, 2013 | Jazz Village

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Jazz - Released May 23, 1988 | Chess

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released July 15, 2013 | Jazz Village

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Jazz - Released July 17, 1985 | Rhino Atlantic

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Ahmad Jamal was never as distinctive on electric piano as he was on the acoustic counterpart, making this two-LP set, Digital Works, (which finds him doubling) a slight disappointment. Jamal does play well throughout, engaging his sidemen (bassist Larry Ball, drummer Herlin Riley, and percussionist Iraj Lashkaryl) in close interplay, but no new revelations occur on such remakes as "But Not for Me," "Wave" and Jamal's greatest hit, "Poinciana." Good music overall, but not essential. ~ Scott Yanow

Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | Impulse!

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
By 1970, pianist Ahmad Jamal's style had changed a bit since the 1950s, becoming denser and more adventurous while still retaining his musical identity. With bassist Jamil Nasser (whose double-timing lines are sometimes furious) and drummer Frank Gant, Jamal performs two originals (playing over a vamp on "Patterns"), the obscure "I Love Music," and four jazz standards. These are intriguing performances showing that Ahmad Jamal was continuing to evolve. ~ Scott Yanow

Jazz - Released November 15, 1986 | Rhino Atlantic

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
This live concert was released on a 1986 double album, Live at the Montreal Jazz Festival 1985. Pianist Ahmad Jamal and his quartet (which also includes bassist James Cammack, drummer Herlin Riley, and percussionist Selden Newton) dig into three originals, an obscurity, Jack DeJohnette's "Ebony," and a trio of jazz standards (including "Footprints"). This particular group is often reminiscent of Jamal's trios of the '50s, although with more modern bass playing and some denser piano than before. ~ Scott Yanow

Jazz - Released June 21, 2012 | Frémeaux & associés

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Jazz - Released March 15, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Few of pianist Ahmad Jamal's many recordings are not worth picking up, and this effort for Atlantic boasts some fresh material and fine playing. Jamal (joined by bassist James Cammack, drummer Herlin Riley, and percussionist Manolo Badrena) performs seven of his little-known originals and the obscure "Yellow Fellow." The close musical communication by the players is, as always, the main reason to acquire this release. ~ Scott Yanow

Jazz - Released January 1, 1994 | The Verve Music Group

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
Ahmad's 1994 self-titled debut was G-funk lite. It avoided the gangsta violence and cultural criticism that defined much of the music from his South Central neighborhood, and followed instead in the laid-back footsteps of Dr. Dre's epochal 1992 release The Chronic. While it lacked Dre's midas production and wasn't quite as solid as stylistic contemporary Montell Jordan's This Is How We Do It, Ahmad was still full of great songs. With its images of playground foolery and junior-high discovery, "Back in the Day" depicted Ahmad's boyhood days in an idyllic, wistful light -- a hip-hop Norman Rockwell painting. It was the only significant single from Ahmad's debut, but by no means was it the only thing worth hearing. "Touch the Ceiling," "Can I Party?," and the self-explanatory "We Want the Funk" were all charming, Parliament/Funkadelic-style jams. "Homeboys First," while a bit clichéd, was rumbling and jocular, with a debt to Low End Theory-era Tribe Called Quest. Ahmad wasn't able to capitalize on his success, and eventually faded from sight. But his debut is a memorable ride, with a youthful, effervescent vibe as warm as the California sun. ~ Johnny Loftus

Jazz - Released October 15, 1987 | Rhino Atlantic

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
There are some magical moments on this quartet set featuring pianist Ahmad Jamal, bassist James Cammack, drummer David Bowles and percussionist Willie White. Jamal's control of dynamics and inventive use of space proved to be as effective as it had been when he first made his mark in the 1950s, although his chord voicings and general style had evolved. Jamal and his group perform ten of his originals with taste, swing and subtle surprises. ~ Scott Yanow

Jazz - Released February 14, 2014 | Epic - Legacy

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2011 | Impulse!

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
This set from the 1971 Montreux Jazz Festival has one of pianist Ahmad Jamal's finest recordings of the early '70s. Performing with bassist Jamil Sulieman Nasser and drummer Frank Gant, Jamal shows that his basic style has evolved since the 1950s but is still quite recognizable. He uses the electric piano as a double for color and stretches out on three numbers (including a remake of his hit "Poinciana") in addition to playing a five-minute version of Herbie Hancock's "Dolphin Dance." An excellent effort. ~ Scott Yanow

Jazz - Released November 20, 2007 | Rhino Atlantic

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Jazz - Released June 8, 2015 | Jazz Village

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