Albums

563 albums sorted by Date: from newest to oldest
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Duets - Released September 22, 2017 | Calliope

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Chamber Music - Released September 22, 2017 | audite Musikproduktion

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Poor Reger! With his pudgy figure and his pouty face, appearances have taken precedence over his music which many consider as pudgy and pouty. Which it is not. Yes, Reger was a firm supporter of absolute music, following the tradition of Beethoven and Brahms whose classical structures he combined with Wagner’s extended harmonies, adding Bach’s counterpoint; some of his works seem dense and complicated. But this is not the case with his chamber music – by the bye, chamber music makes up the biggest part of Reger’s œuvre – which reflects a condensed version of his stylistic development. And in contrast to his almost symphonic string quartets, the String Trios Opp 77b and 141b seem less symbolist-expressive than historistic-classicist. The confident, at times even cheerful (not pudgy and not pouty), character of these works convey the (superficial) impression of simplicity, despite which Reger remained true to his own style, as he explained in a letter where he described the composition as “absolutely not ‘un-Regerian’”. However, the characteristics of this “Regerian” style – dense modulations, surprising metric asymmetries and interesting part writing – are in this case subordinate to the small number of instruments and do not immediately emerge. The composer strove towards a “new simplicity”; in 1904 he wrote: “I know exactly what our music today lacks: a Mozart!” Surely it was also Mozart’s spirit which inspired Reger when he wrote his “miniature chamber music” String Trio Op. 141b in 1915. The same year, the premiere of his Piano Quartet Op. 133 was emphatically celebrated by the critics who praised its “glorious sonorities” and its “vocal, vivid and catchy” melodies. The Op. 77b, String Trio was obviously inspired by Mozart’s Divertimento K563, and the Op. 9 String Trios by Beethoven – as has often been commented upon, Reger frequently enters into an intensive dialogue with historic works of music. Star violinist Franziska Pietsch is joined, in her ensemble Trio Lirico, by a brilliant roster of colleagues, who give life to these highly deserving but neglected works.
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Cantatas (secular) - Released September 1, 2017 | CapriccioNR

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
This is the three-part version of Mahler’s Das Klagende Lied that the Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra brought us. It’s worth pointing out that the composer rearranged his piece many times. The original writing dates from 1880, when he was a proud twenty-year old; after a several refusals, he rewrote the partition in 1883 (considerably reducing the initial orchestral headcount which, admittedly, required titanic forces, and deleting the first act) then again in 1899, proof that he was holding it in some regard. It was only in 1901, when he was finally famous, that he managed to give this work in concert—but in the two-part version—, without much success, as it would seem. And yet, all of Mahler is already in this musical discourse and we shouldn’t be surprised to find many turns from this work in the symphonies and orchestral Lieder. The present recording offers a “hybrid” version, which is actually the most performed, that is to say: the first part Waldmärchen (Forest Legend) in the 1880 writing, then the two following parts Der Spielmann (The Minstrel) and Hochzeitsstück (Wedding Piece), in the 1899 rewriting. © Qobuz
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Solo Piano - Released August 25, 2017 | Sony Classical

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Classical - Released August 25, 2017 | La discothèque idéale de Diapason

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Symphonies - Released July 7, 2017 | BIS

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Chamber Music - Released May 26, 2017 | Alpha

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
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Solo Piano - Released May 12, 2017 | Naxos

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
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Symphonies - Released May 5, 2017 | Channel Classics Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles Classica
As Iván Fischer approaches the completion of his live Mahler cycle with the Budapest Festival Orchestra on Channel Classics, he unexpectedly jumps backward to one of the early symphonies, the Symphony No. 3 in D minor. Fischer is known to take his time studying scores and absorbing them thoroughly before committing to making a recording, so he appears to have waited for more than a decade for something in this work to develop and lead to a fuller understanding. The Symphony No. 3 is Mahler's longest symphony, based in part on material he had used in his song cycle Des Knaben Wunderhorn, so it is challenging in terms of balancing its unusual six-movement form and interpreting its content. That Fischer has achieved unity and clarity in his interpretation is evident in this lucid performance, which is deeply compelling for its dramatic contrasts and moving in its glorious evocation of the spiritual in nature. This 2017 audiophile release features contralto Gerhild Romberger in the somber fourth-movement setting of the "Midnight Song," taken from Friedrich Nietzche's Also sprach Zarathustra, and she is joined by the Cantemus Children's Choir and the Bavarian Radio Choir in the joyous fifth movement, which is a setting of the Wunderhorn song "Es sungen drei Engel einen süßen Gesang." Yet the purely orchestral Finale is one of Mahler's most sublime movements, and the Budapest Festival Orchestra plays with a warm radiance that brings this symphony to its inspiring conclusion.
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Solo Piano - Released April 14, 2017 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - 4 étoiles Classica
Disciple of Vlado Perlemuter and Jean Hubeau, Michel Dalberto has stood out as a master and ardent defender of French music in the course of a forty-year career. His signature for the Aparté label of a series of recordings devoted to Debussy, Fauré, Ravel, and Franck marks his awaited return to discs. Each episode will be recorded live and accompanied by a video. This second release, recorded on a Bechstein piano at the Conservatoire d’Art Dramatique-Paris on 7 January 2017, honours Gabriel Fauré.
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Classical - Released March 22, 2017 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Art Songs, Mélodies & Lieder - Released March 10, 2017 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica
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Duets - Released February 17, 2017 | BMC Records

Distinctions Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique
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Symphonies - Released February 17, 2017 | BR-Klassik

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Symphonic Music - Released February 3, 2017 | Halle Concerts Society

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
This album in Hallé’s series of recordings of works by Elgar couples his last great choral work, the largely overlooked The Spirit of England, with a fascinating collection of works which similarly remember the departed. Thematically linked to The Dream of Gerontius, the work sets texts from WWI poets and was premiered in sections during 1916 and 1917. In tone it is close to the melancholy of the Cello Concerto; and Britten referred to its music as displaying “personal tenderness and grief” as well as “genuine splendour”. Next, Elgar’s melodrama A Voice in the Wilderness movingly depicts the contrasting moods of the desolate and subdued Western Front by night and the soaring, aspiring lines by Belgian poet Emile Cammaerts, in the original English translation offered by the poet’s own English wife. Narration alternates with lines sung by the soprano voice, hence the term « melodrama ». The remaining two works on the album present works inspired by Irish literature. Grania and Diarmid was a play based on tales of Irish mythology. Elgar’s music for the play, a story of tragic entangled love, was described by playright W.B. Yeats as “wonderful in its heroic melancholy”. Bax’s rarely performed orchestral work In Memoriam is subtitled ‘An Irish Elegy’. It reflects the composer’s passionate interest in, and love for, Ireland, her literature and her tragic early twentieth century history – including the Easter Rising of April 1916 and the subsequent execution of some of its leaders which deeply shocked Bax who, though English-born, spent most of his adult life in Ireland. The resultant music contrasts angry outbursts with more mellow episodes featuring melody of profound sadness and lyricism.