Albums

1782 albums sorted by Date: from newest to oldest
£14.39
£9.59

Classical - Released October 20, 2017 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet
£15.98

Classical - Released October 6, 2017 | CPO

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
£15.98

Full Operas - Released October 6, 2017 | LSO Live

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Editor's Choice
£11.99
£8.49

Solo Piano - Released September 8, 2017 | Mirare

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
This album from the pianist Luis Fernando Pérez (a student of Dimitri Bashkirov, Alicia de Larrocha and Pierre-Laurent Aimard) includes the entirety of the Cançons i Danses, or at least the ones intended for piano. Mompou composed fifteen of them, of which the thirteenth is for guitar and the fifteenth is for organ. The composition dates of these works range from 1921 to 1961 for the first twelve, while the fourteenth dates from 1978, created at the Lincoln Center in New York for the composer’s 85th birthday. Scènes d ́enfants, one of the jewels from his catalog, and one of his most renowned works, was created between 1915 and 1918, in other words at the start of his creative years. Although “Iberianising”, if you forgive our use of this term, Mompou didn’t like to be referred to as a nationalist composer, preferring the term regionalist. “Not really knowing the true style of my music,” he said, “I’ve been classified as an exclusively folkloric composer, against which I had to express my disapprobation many times. My only arrogance is to believe that I managed to create an ethnic sounding music, without falling into the trap and excess of popular themes.” Luis Fernando Pérez is a regular of prestigious festivals such as Schleswig-Holstein, La Roque d'Anthéron, Richter in La Grange de Meslay, Jacobins in Toulouse, Santander and Granada, the Musical Fortnight in Donosti and Musika-Musica of Bilbao. He has been a soloist for the Symphony Orchestra of Barcelona and National of Catalonia, Real Filharmonía of Galicia, Symphony of Bilbao, Symphony of the Principality of Asturias, Orchestral Ensemble of Paris and Kanazawa, Symphony Warsaw, Symphony of Euskadi, the RTVE Symphony, the Franz Liszt Chamber Orchestra of Budapest and the Mannheim Chamber Orchestra, and also the National Orchestra of Spain.
£5.59

Chamber Music - Released August 24, 2017 | Les Indispensables de Diapason

Distinctions Diapason d'or
£7.99

Classical - Released August 4, 2017 | DUX

Booklet
£16.99
£14.49

Classical - Released June 16, 2017 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Alas - a thousand times alas - for the German composer Rudi Stephan: after a thundering début, he went to war, and died on the front in 1915, leaving behind only a tiny handful of works. And as if that wasn't misfortune enough, almost all his manuscripts which weren't published were destroyed by bombs in 1945. So we will never know what could have been - without doubt, he could have become one of the great composers of the 20th Century, alongside Strauss, whose latter-day romanticism he followed, or Schönberg, whose first explorations of the atonal world seemed to fascinate him - or indeed, what works he created in life. This album proposes to uncover the whole of his Lieder, written between 1905 and 1914, for soprano (here, Tehila Nini Goldstein), and for baritone (here, Hanno Müller-Brachmann): they are wonders of invention, of fortitude, and of modernism, which really deserve to be discovered. By way of introduction, we are treated to a Groteske for violin and piano from 1911, in which one can discern parallels with Bartók. The vocal "apex" of the album is without a doubt the sumptuous ballad Liebeszauber of 1913, which was originally written for baritone and orchestra, but here is re-written for a string ensemble. And to close the album we have 1911's extraordinary Music for seven string instruments, i.e. two violins, alto, cello, double-bass, piano and harp. Taken together, these works provide the listener with firm proof that Stephan was truly on his way to becoming one of the all-time greats. © SM/Qobuz
£11.99
£8.49

Operettas - Released June 9, 2017 | Klarthe

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
£23.98
£15.98

Symphonic Music - Released June 2, 2017 | Chandos Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
£11.99
£8.49

Violin Solos - Released May 19, 2017 | RUBICON

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
£11.99
£7.99

Symphonic Music - Released May 19, 2017 | Chandos Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles Classica
The BBC Philharmonic has launched a highly interesting new series dedicated to George Antheil’s symphonic works, the totally underrated music of a composer who began his career with a reputation as an enfant terrible during his formative years in Europe, where he composed a succession of shockingly avant-garde works, including Ballet mécanique in 1925. In this and his other early modernist pieces, the self-styled “Bad Boy of Music” was heavily influenced by the rhythmic dynamism and crushing dissonances of Stravinsky’s early ballets, but his stylistic preoccupations would change markedly after his return to the USA in 1933. He moved towards a fundamentally tonal and melody-based style, surprising those who knew his earlier experimental music by now joining the growing ranks of US symphonists working in tuneful neo-classical and neo-romantic idioms. Antheil considered his Symphony No. 4, begun in 1942, to be a meditation on several aspects of the ongoing war: the massacre in Lidice for the second movement, while the third, a Scherzo, was “a brutal joke, the joke of war”. The Allies’ eventual triumph was adumbrated in the symphony’s dynamic finale. The work was a tremendous success with both critics and concert-goers, and Time magazine felt that the premiere was an “almost unprecedented” phenomenon: a new American symphony which “failed to bore its audience”. The Time reviewer, however, suggested strong influence of Shostakovich; particularly obvious were the apparent nods towards the Russian composer’s bombastic “Leningrad” Symphony (No. 7), first heard in the United States in July 1942. Antheil resented this implication, however, writing in his autobiography that the passage in the middle of his first movement which had most frequently been attributed to his fondness for Shostakovich had in fact been recycled note-for-note from his own opera Transatlantic published as early as 1928 (the reader can readily check that here, track 20). As Antheil was quick to point out, this music therefore had originated during a time just somewhat before Shostakovich had written even one symphony. In 1947, Antheil put the score of a new but unfinished Fifth symphony aside (the work would become the unnumbered tragic Symphony) and devoted himself instead to a completely different Symphony No. 5; this new work would have a far more celebratory nature, as its sobriquet, “Joyous”, unashamedly indicated. Antheil regarded the symphony as marking his final break from what he called “the now passé” musical modernism of the early twentieth century. In his review of the Carnegie Hall performance, music critic Virgil Thomson declared Symphony No. 5 to be Antheil’s best work to date. The album begins with the short Over the Plains (1945, here a world premiere recording), recalling the emotions that he had experienced when travelling through Texas ten years before, on which occasion he knew that one day he would write a piece celebrating not only the optimistic, pioneering spirit that the view had inspired but also the cheerfulness of the local inhabitants. © SM/Qobuz
£7.99

Symphonic Music - Released May 12, 2017 | SWR Classic

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
£14.39
£9.59

Symphonic Music - Released May 5, 2017 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
£7.99

Classical - Released May 5, 2017 | CapriccioNR

Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
Viktor Ullmann’s output may be classified in two parts : works composed during his Prague years between 1920 and 1942 – many, tragically many of which have disappeared during the Nazi occupation of the country –; and those written during his deportation in Theresienstadt, from September 1942 to October 16th, 1944, when he was transferred to Auschwitz where his life did not last more than two days… The Piano Concerto Op. 25 was finished December 1936, nine months after the Nazi’s entrance in Prague. At that time Ullmann had already shed his earlier language inherited from Schönberg, and returned to a considerable dose of tonality reminding the listener much more of Poulenc and Zemlinsky, as well as Mahler from time to time. As for his Seventh Piano Sonata, dated 22 August 1944 (hence less than two months before his transportation to Auschwitz), it does under no circumstance sound like whjat the listener might imagine as a work written in a concentration camp. Once again, Poulenc and even Satie might be some of the pillars of his compositional process, and if the third movement does rely on some Schönbergian mists and the scherzo remind of the existence of Pierrot Lunaire, the fifth and last uses a Hebraic folksong as a basis for some ultimate variations. And speaking of variations, the last item on this album signed Moritz Ernst – who leads a successful double career as both pianist and harpsichordist, with a marked preference for the 20th and 21st Century music for both instruments – is a set of Variations followed by a double fugue, on a theme by Schönberg, written 1933. Here Ullmann’s inspiration does still hark back to the atonal teachings of his mentor, very far indeed from the music written later on. © SM/Qobuz
£11.99
£7.99

Cello Concertos - Released April 28, 2017 | Musique en Wallonie

Hi-Res Booklet