Albums

1810 albums sorted by Date: from newest to oldest
£5.59

Chamber Music - Released August 24, 2017 | Les Indispensables de Diapason

Distinctions Diapason d'or
£7.99

Classical - Released August 4, 2017 | DUX

Booklet
£11.99
£8.49

Operettas - Released June 9, 2017 | Klarthe

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
£23.98
£15.98

Symphonic Music - Released June 2, 2017 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
£11.99
£8.49

Violin Solos - Released May 19, 2017 | RUBICON

Hi-Res Booklet
£7.99

Symphonic Music - Released May 12, 2017 | SWR Classic

Booklet
£14.39
£9.59

Symphonic Music - Released May 5, 2017 | PentaTone

Hi-Res Booklet
£7.99

Classical - Released May 5, 2017 | CapriccioNR

Viktor Ullmann’s output may be classified in two parts : works composed during his Prague years between 1920 and 1942 – many, tragically many of which have disappeared during the Nazi occupation of the country –; and those written during his deportation in Theresienstadt, from September 1942 to October 16th, 1944, when he was transferred to Auschwitz where his life did not last more than two days… The Piano Concerto Op. 25 was finished December 1936, nine months after the Nazi’s entrance in Prague. At that time Ullmann had already shed his earlier language inherited from Schönberg, and returned to a considerable dose of tonality reminding the listener much more of Poulenc and Zemlinsky, as well as Mahler from time to time. As for his Seventh Piano Sonata, dated 22 August 1944 (hence less than two months before his transportation to Auschwitz), it does under no circumstance sound like whjat the listener might imagine as a work written in a concentration camp. Once again, Poulenc and even Satie might be some of the pillars of his compositional process, and if the third movement does rely on some Schönbergian mists and the scherzo remind of the existence of Pierrot Lunaire, the fifth and last uses a Hebraic folksong as a basis for some ultimate variations. And speaking of variations, the last item on this album signed Moritz Ernst – who leads a successful double career as both pianist and harpsichordist, with a marked preference for the 20th and 21st Century music for both instruments – is a set of Variations followed by a double fugue, on a theme by Schönberg, written 1933. Here Ullmann’s inspiration does still hark back to the atonal teachings of his mentor, very far indeed from the music written later on. © SM/Qobuz
£11.99
£7.99

Cello Concertos - Released April 28, 2017 | Musique en Wallonie

Hi-Res Booklet
£21.59
£14.39

Classical - Released April 17, 2017 | Solstice

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
£15.98

Solo Piano - Released April 14, 2017 | Grand Piano

Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
£7.19
£4.79

Symphonic Music - Released April 14, 2017 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet
£11.99
£7.99

Full Operas - Released April 7, 2017 | BR-Klassik

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
Recorded live in April 2016 at the Prinzregententheater in Munich with the Bavarian Radio Orchestra, this new rendering of Ravel’s L’Heure espagnole boasts, above all, an exemplary cast with only native French-speaking singers – four Frenchmen, Gaëlle Arquez as Concepción, Julien Behr as Gonzalve, Mathias Vidal as Torquemada, Alexandre Duhamel as Ramiro – and the Belgian Lionel Lhote singing Don Iñigo Gomez. In other words, and this is not such a frequent occurrence, the happy listener will be able to hear the work sung by a marvelously youthful cast with perfect experience and a totally impeccable French pronunciation, as well as an insiders’ understanding of the libretto’s gallic essence. This is a recording that ranks very high amongst the best recordings of Ravel’s masterpiece. © SM/Qobuz
£7.99

Ballets - Released April 7, 2017 | CPO

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
£11.50
£8.63

Solo Piano - Released March 17, 2017 | Piano Classics

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 de Diapason