Albums

2442 albums sorted by Date: from newest to oldest

Symphonic Music - To be released December 1, 2017 | Aeolus

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Hi-Res Audio

Classical - To be released December 1, 2017 | Aeolus

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Exceptional Sound Productions
£16.99
£14.49

Classical - Released October 6, 2017 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
£7.99

Choral Music (Choirs) - Released October 6, 2017 | CPO

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
£7.99

Classical - Released October 1, 2017 | Passacaille

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
£17.99
£11.99

Chamber Music - Released September 29, 2017 | Evidence

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
£16.99
£14.49

Classical - Released September 15, 2017 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
This record sees the most francophone (and francophile) of the German tenors take up a few pearls from the French repertoire. What's more, it's not only the big hits: "La fleur que tu m’avais jetée" is up in front, but also – or even, first and foremost – much rarer pearls have been fished up from the shoals of Meyerbeer, Berlioz, Thomas or Lalo. Jonas Kaufmann has succeeded in developing an irreproachable French elocution, in an equally impeccable style, denuded of the base Italianisms – glissandos, cooing, sobs, parasitic diphthongs, fermatas on the high Cs, etc. – that so many tenors (Italians, yes, but also French singers, including some stars...) impose on this music, which is not built to support them. Kaufmann's voice, which almost approaches a baritone, confers a different masculinity onto these roles (which is neither a virtue nor a vice, but a fundamental quality) and a depth for which the roles of Nadir, Don José or Werther all cry out. Moreover, Kaufmann's dynamic palette, from the fullest fortissimo to the suavest murmur, including on the high notes, is a joy to behold. The excellent Ludovic Tézier provides his counterpart in the duo of Pêcheurs de perles, while Sonia Yoncheva takes on the role of the tender Manon - even if the latter's French still leaves a little to be desired. © SM/Qobuz
£11.99
£8.49

Classical - Released September 8, 2017 | La Dolce Volta

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
£11.99
£8.49

Classical - Released September 8, 2017 | Aparté

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica
For his new album Soave e virtuoso, Alexis Kossenko went on the trail of rare scores from the baroque era. Partitions that remind us that the Italian repertory, if it gives pride of place to the the violin and the voice, nevertheless doesn’t forget wind instruments. At the head of his ensemble Les Ambassadeurs, the conductor and flutist Alexis Kossenko performs delightly concertos by Tartini, Vivaldi and Sammartini. Sometimes voluptuous, sometimes dreadfully acrobatic, these scores require technique and sensitivity from the soloist. With a jubilant virtuosity, at the service of expressiveness, Alexis Kossenko, multi-skilled musician as at ease with flute as with recorder, brings life in colors to the works of the three Italian composers. © Aparté
£7.99

Classical - Released September 1, 2017 | LSO Live

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Choc de Classica
£11.99
£7.99

Chamber Music - Released September 1, 2017 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
While the title Lachrymæ or Seaven Teares might suggest works filled with sorrow, all of its tears aren’t equal. As Dowland correctly pointed out in his preface to the 1604 original edition that there are tears of joy, happiness and relief, in addition to those shed because of grief and despair. Furthermore the title doesn’t tell the whole story, as the collection also holds numerous other works in addition to the seven lacrimal pillars: pavanes, galliards, allemandes. The instrumentation of purely instrumental pieces as well as the accompaniment of vocal parts is given to the lute, the viols or sometimes both, depending on availability… Here of course, the Chelys Consort of Viols, lutenist James Akers and soprano Emma Kirkby have everything at their disposal to bring these masterpieces back to life in ideal conditions. In addition to Dowland’s pieces – the Seaven Teares as well as several tracks chosen from Lachrymaæ – the small troupe gives us a few moments borrowed from some of Dowland’s contemporaries, such as Jones, Hume, Simpson, Holborne and Danyel, for matters of comparison with what was made at the time, but along different lines. © SM/Qobuz
£20.99
£18.49

Concertos - Released September 1, 2017 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
The previous batch from the 2015 Lugano Festival was especially rich, with many of the chosen moments being particularly thrilling (Brahms’ Trio, Poulenc’s Sonata for two pianos). The 2016 Festival would in turn see one great event: the tremendous Martha agreed to play on stage, for the first time in more than thirty years, Ravel’s Gaspard de la nuit. She was worried at the thought of measuring herself against her own success from forty years ago—she recorded in 1974 for Deutsche Grammophon a Ravel LP featuring Gaspard, Sonatine and Valses nobles et sentimentales, which is still in everyone’s memory despite its disappointing sound recording. On the spot, it’s obviously all the magic from a sound completely revealing itself, and the permanence of a vision. The truly haunted tone of Le Gibet leaves a lasting impression, Scarbo’s goblin literally shatters when Ondine, completely radiant, screams her recollections of Liszt and remembers just as much Une barque sur l’océan written a few years before. The rest of the testimonies from this 2016 Lugano Festival is as varied as usual. We’ll start with the rarity among the musical repertoire that is Busoni’s Violin Concerto, in D major (like the ones from Beethoven, Brahms, Tchaikovsky), also being the opus 35 (like the ones from Tchaikovsky, Korngold), under Renaud Capuçon’s determined bow. As for the two pianos, a classic from Argerich’s repertoire, Mozart Sonata for Two Pianos K. 488 that she’s enjoyed playing regularly with her friends for a few years, here with Sergey Babayan. And let’s not forget the very sincere Horn Trio from Brahms, with the trio Capuçon, Angelich & Guerrier (in 2015, a version without horn was unforgettable), or especially Bach’s Sonata by Martha Argerich and Tedi Papavrami, which could make us forget to not have this duo play the five other works written by Bach for the same formation. We cannot ignore the too short moment from the duo Tiempo & Lechner, as thrilling as ever, here in two Falla’s dances. During this 2016 edition, Argerich also played Ravel’s Concerto in G major. Maybe not in its most extraordinary version, but listening to its phrasings, accents, and nuances that are so personal in the Adagio assai this work remains the source of a rare emotion. May this Lugano Festival resuscitate in a few years with the participation of generous sponsors nostalgic of these incredible moments. © PYL
£13.99
£11.99

Classical - Released September 1, 2017 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
Fazil Say, who made his debut on this label with a very, very well-received work on Mozart’s Complete Piano Sonatas, is now turning his attention to Chopin, but a more confidential side of Chopin, much less virtuoso, the Chopin Nocturnes, the almost complete work of which he recorded in the Mozarteum Salzburg in March 2016. An “almost complete work” because the Nocturne in C-Sharp minor Op. 71/1 is missing, most likely due to CD running time restrictions as the total exceeded the limit by just a handful of seconds… Regardless the interpretation is dazzling and almost symphonic, taking these Nocturnes out of the hyper-romantic state of torpor they are so frequently plunged in by musicians. In addition to Chopin’s music, a few of Say’s short-lived grunts can also be heard who, much like Gould (albeit to a lesser extent), sometimes enjoys humming in the background. © SM/Qobuz
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£10.49

Classical - Released August 25, 2017 | Decca

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
£11.99
£7.99

Classical - Released August 25, 2017 | Alpha

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Cardinals Benedetto Pamphili and Pietro Ottoboni played a prominent role in Rome at the turn of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries with their patronage of the three most important composers of the day, Corelli, Alessandro Scarlatti and Handel. At that time, numerous musicians converged on Rome, and the large orchestra directed by Arcangelo Corelli at the church of San Luigi dei Francesi included several famous cellists, among them G. L. Lular, N. F. Haym, F. Amadei and G. M. Perroni. As well as notable virtuosos, these men were often also composers of oratorios, vocal music, and pieces for their own favourite instrument, though very few of these have survived. It is to their music, often unpublished, that Marco Ceccato and his Accademia, winners of a Diapason d’Or of the year in 2015, introduce us here, along with works by the composers who subsequently formed the core of this group after Handel left for London: G. Bononcini, P. G. P. Boni, and G. B. Costanzi, who was later to teach Boccherini. © Alpha