Albums

1178 albums sorted by Date: from newest to oldest
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Classical - Released October 27, 2017 | Le Palais des Dégustateurs

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
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Classical - Released October 6, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
First you think : “here we go... yet agaaaaain another recording of Chopin’s two concertos”, then you read ‘world premiere’ in the description. Surprising, isn’t it? And yet, this is the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth! This world premiere is describing the brand new orchestrations realised by Mikhail Pletnev. These re-orchestrations give prominence to the much more chamber-like aspect of the accompaniment, which admittedly is a little pale and formulaic in the version that we’ve known for almost two centuries. Pletnev has moderated the music score, thinning out some parts while not changing a single note: the piano part remains the same, and in the orchestra nothing changes apart from the instrumental assignation. In addition to those two concertos that are much more colorful, the pianist Daniil Trifonov offers us a handful of tributes to Chopin by his peers and successors: Schumann, whose admiration for the Polish composer wasn’t reciprocated, Grieg, Barber and Tchaikovsky, and most of all Mompou’s splendid series of Variations on a Theme of Chopin. New from old, but always for the best we won’t hasten to add. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 6, 2017 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
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Classical - Released September 29, 2017 | Erato - Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica - Qobuzissime - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
For their first recording, the Arod Quartet has selected Mendelssohn, one of the pillars of the quartet's art, in particular his masterpiece, the Fourth Quartet in E Minor of June 1837 - more Mozartian than Beethovian in its structure and development, to be sure, even if it bears Mendelssohn's hallmark from the first note to the last. To find the influence of the deaf genius, we have to look in the Second Quartet Op. 13 of 1827, a work written shortly after Beethoven's death, the full extent of whose innovations Mendelssohn was only just discovering. The Arod Quartet continues its album with Four Pieces for Quartet, assembled posthumously and numbered Op. 81 by Mendelssohn's successor at the Gewandhaus, Julius Rietz, and based on four disparate pieces from various eras. Finally, the album closes with the Arod's re-interpretaton of a Lied, sung here by Marianne Crebassa, whose theme takes in several passages from Beethoven note for note, a real homage from the young composer to his illustrious elder. It’s worth noting that the Arod Quartet, only founded in 2013, has shot to global prominence, having performed at the Paris Philharmonic, the Louvre Auditorium, the Théâtre des Bouffes du Nord, the Metz Arsenal, and further afield the Salzburg Mozarteum, the Vienna Konzerthaus, the Amsterdam Concertgebouw, the Zurich Tonhalle, London's Wigmore Hall, as well as in Tokyo, Finland, Switzerland... the list goes on! © SM/Qobuz
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Chamber Music - Released September 29, 2017 | Evidence

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
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Opera - Released September 22, 2017 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
The pianists are perhaps the most exotic of all the creatures in the Carnival of the Animals. A very rare and treasurable pairing has been made by Warner Classics for this new recording of Saint-Saëns’ enchantingly witty suite: Martha Argerich, often described as the world’s finest example of the pianist species, and Antonio Pappano, a particularly fine specimen of the conductor-pianist. Beside such natural wonders as the graceful swan, the mighty lion, the waltzing elephant, the iridescent denizens of the aquarium and the rattling fossils, the pianists are the prize exhibits of the Carnival, bringing their colour and virtuosity to all but one of its fourteen movements. Their big solo moment comes towards the end of proceedings as they relentlessly practise their scales, which are punctuated with peremptory chords from the strings. Argerich and Pappano met in Italy for the recording – not in Venice, the city of Carnival, but in Rome, where, since 2005, Pappano has been Music Director of the Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia. Nine of its players partner the two star pianists in Saint-Saëns’ suite. In 2012, when Argerich performed Schumann’s Piano Concerto with the Orchestra dell’Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, Pappano told Euronews that he was “just knocked over by the amount of energy that she has, but actually what she does is always extremely natural, as if the music can’t go any other way.” Argerich’s daughter, Annie Dutoit also makes a contribution to the Carnival: she recites verses written for the piece by the French actor, singer, humorist Francis Blanche (1921-1974). The Carnival shares the album release with another of Saint-Saëns’ most celebrated works, the magnificent Symphony No. 3. The prominent organ part is played by Daniele Rossi. Both the Carnival and the Symphony No. 3 were composed in the same year, 1886, but their aesthetics could hardly be more different. In Spring 2016 the Symphony No. 3 featured on a European tour that Pappano made with the Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia. In Germany, the Hamburger Abendblatt reported that the audience responded to the performance of the symphony with “euphoria …stamping on the ground and calling for two encores,” while the Frankfurter Rundschau wrote that “under Pappano’s inspiring direction the Italian musicians captured the reverential, ethereal atmosphere [of the first movement’s Poco adagio] with the same precision as the circus-like uproar of its combined instrumental masses [in the Allegro finale].” This was the last symphony that Saint-Saëns composed, though he lived for a further 35 years. When asked why, he responded: "With it I have given all I could give. What I did I could not achieve again." © Warner
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Solo Piano - Released September 22, 2017 | naïve classique

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
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Solo Piano - Released September 22, 2017 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
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Classical - Released September 22, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
After his exciting journey into the musical tradition of Eastern Europe (Journey East) and the Baroque sound-scapes of J.S. Bach (Bach), Nemanja Radulović now turns his attention to the Russian master of the Romantic era, Tchaikovsky, excelling as violinist and (in an arrangement of the famed Rococo-Variations for viola and string ensemble) a violist. For Nemanja Radulović a personal approach when creating an album is essential. Bringing together Tchaikovsky’s two most important works for solo strings and orchestra is bringing together the two of the most relevant poles of his life –  Belgrade and Paris: The Rococo Variations are linked to the first part of his life, when he was a student in Belgrade before the Balkan war. At this time Nemanja not only used to playing the violin, but also the viola and sometimes the cello. Playing an arranged viola version of the Rococo variations which originally were composed for cello takes him back to his musical childhood in Belgrade. Yvan Cassar, who worked with Nemanja on Journey East has now produced compelling arrangements for strings and piano of the Rococo Variations. They provide a lightness and an energy that are perfectly suited for Tchaikovsky’s music. The Rococo Variations were recorded in Belgrade with ensemble Double Sens (French for: “double direction” & “double meaning”). The group reflects perfectly Nemanja’s dual past between Paris and Belgrade as it includes his former student-friends from Serbia, and his friends from the Conservatoire de Paris (including 2 members of the Fontanarosa family). The Tchaikovsky concerto is linked to Nemanja’s arrival in Paris. He began to work on the concerto with his Conservatoire de Paris’ teacher Patrice Fontanarosa. Since then, this piece has been the concerto Nemanja has played most often during his career, opening the doors to the great concert halls of the world like in Paris, London or Tokyo. The concerto was recorded in Istanbul with the Borusan Istanbul Philharmonic Orchestra and Sascha Goetzel, with which Nemanja feels he finds the freedom to develop and express what is fundamentally important to him in the respective work.
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Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released September 22, 2017 | harmonia mundi

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
The six young singers of the Academy of Le Jardin des Voix, selected from several hundred candidates, offer us a musical journey through some of the finest pieces in the Italian repertory, from a Banchieri madrigal to Haydn’s Orlando paladino. Thanks to an outstanding training programme and the musical values transmitted by William Christie and Paul Agnew, here is a chance to discover both some splendid vocal gems and a group of new performers who honour them with talent, grace and humour. Sheer delight! © harmonia mundi
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Classical - Released September 8, 2017 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles Classica
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Classical - Released September 1, 2017 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
To celebrate Vladimir Ashkenazy’s 80th birthday, together with the Oxford Philharmonic Orchestra and the young violinist Irmina Trynkos, this album is a world premiere recording featuring three works by Nimrod Borenstein, a composer whom Ashkenazy has admired and supported for many years. The three pieces differ in size and character, but the composer’s humble hope is that “whilst you listen to them your first thought will be ‘Borenstein’, just as when you hear an unfamiliar piece by a composer you already know you think ‘Beethoven’, ‘Chopin’, or ‘Prokofiev’ – because you recognise something unique to its creator”, quite an ambition to be sure. The short orchestral piece If You Will It, It Is No Dream (2013) is considered as an intense journey into the struggle and wonders of the will, and also an homage to Borenstein’s native country, Israel. The piece contains several examples of his fascination with the feeling of suspension, moments when time seems to pause. The Big Bang and Creation of the Universe (2008-2009) Borenstein’s biggest symphonic work to date, is a piece in which the importance of contrasts – an idée fixe in his style and language – is particularly clear. His search for new ways to create and explore contrasts, the composer explains, has led him to develop a personal system of “multimelodic” counterpoint, using complex juxtapositions of rhythms to create a multiplicity of different atmospheres. When he started to write his Violin Concerto (2012), Borenstein was determined to create a large-scale piece for the violin repertoire, to continue in the line of imposing, “big” concertos by Brahms, Sibelius, or Shostakovich – a challenge particularly dear to him as a violinist. The composer conceives virtuosity as not only the capacity to play fast and precisely but, even more essentially, as the mastery of colours and nuances, and the individuality of the voice. Now, dear reader, it’s up to your ears to fathom the deep musical reasons why Ashkenazy has been championing Borenstein’s music for years and years.
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Classical - Released September 1, 2017 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
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Concertos - Released September 1, 2017 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
The previous batch from the 2015 Lugano Festival was especially rich, with many of the chosen moments being particularly thrilling (Brahms’ Trio, Poulenc’s Sonata for two pianos). The 2016 Festival would in turn see one great event: the tremendous Martha agreed to play on stage, for the first time in more than thirty years, Ravel’s Gaspard de la nuit. She was worried at the thought of measuring herself against her own success from forty years ago—she recorded in 1974 for Deutsche Grammophon a Ravel LP featuring Gaspard, Sonatine and Valses nobles et sentimentales, which is still in everyone’s memory despite its disappointing sound recording. On the spot, it’s obviously all the magic from a sound completely revealing itself, and the permanence of a vision. The truly haunted tone of Le Gibet leaves a lasting impression, Scarbo’s goblin literally shatters when Ondine, completely radiant, screams her recollections of Liszt and remembers just as much Une barque sur l’océan written a few years before. The rest of the testimonies from this 2016 Lugano Festival is as varied as usual. We’ll start with the rarity among the musical repertoire that is Busoni’s Violin Concerto, in D major (like the ones from Beethoven, Brahms, Tchaikovsky), also being the opus 35 (like the ones from Tchaikovsky, Korngold), under Renaud Capuçon’s determined bow. As for the two pianos, a classic from Argerich’s repertoire, Mozart Sonata for Two Pianos K. 488 that she’s enjoyed playing regularly with her friends for a few years, here with Sergey Babayan. And let’s not forget the very sincere Horn Trio from Brahms, with the trio Capuçon, Angelich & Guerrier (in 2015, a version without horn was unforgettable), or especially Bach’s Sonata by Martha Argerich and Tedi Papavrami, which could make us forget to not have this duo play the five other works written by Bach for the same formation. We cannot ignore the too short moment from the duo Tiempo & Lechner, as thrilling as ever, here in two Falla’s dances. During this 2016 edition, Argerich also played Ravel’s Concerto in G major. Maybe not in its most extraordinary version, but listening to its phrasings, accents, and nuances that are so personal in the Adagio assai this work remains the source of a rare emotion. May this Lugano Festival resuscitate in a few years with the participation of generous sponsors nostalgic of these incredible moments. © PYL
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Classical - Released September 1, 2017 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
Fazil Say, who made his debut on this label with a very, very well-received work on Mozart’s Complete Piano Sonatas, is now turning his attention to Chopin, but a more confidential side of Chopin, much less virtuoso, the Chopin Nocturnes, the almost complete work of which he recorded in the Mozarteum Salzburg in March 2016. An “almost complete work” because the Nocturne in C-Sharp minor Op. 71/1 is missing, most likely due to CD running time restrictions as the total exceeded the limit by just a handful of seconds… Regardless the interpretation is dazzling and almost symphonic, taking these Nocturnes out of the hyper-romantic state of torpor they are so frequently plunged in by musicians. In addition to Chopin’s music, a few of Say’s short-lived grunts can also be heard who, much like Gould (albeit to a lesser extent), sometimes enjoys humming in the background. © SM/Qobuz