Albums

€29.99

Diction - Released July 13, 2017 | Naxos Audiobooks

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
€11.99

Ska & Rocksteady - Released May 26, 2017 | Soul Jazz Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography

Bandes originales de films - Released October 28, 2016 | Editions Milan Music

Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography

Jazz - Released June 24, 2016 | Ace Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography

Country - Released April 18, 2016 | Light In The Attic

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Reissued by HackTone after its original CD issue in 1995, Heartworn Highways is the sonic companion to the classic 1981 documentary of the same name. David Gorman goes out of his way to tell listeners/purchasers that this disc is not the soundtrack to the film because there never was one. HackTone "had to go back to the original film elements and Nagra tapes with the film's editor and producer to create one," according to Gorman. They "spent months working between them and an audio restoration engineer in New York to make a stand-alone album out of audio that works perfectly well while watching the film but would sound horribly disjointed otherwise. In fact, most of the performances in the film are edited down to about 1/4 their original length." This is key because it must have been a very painful process at time--especially during the 'round table' recordings on Christmas Eve at the end of the album. The microphone was literally in motion during the entire evening, trying to capture whoever was singing lead; but you'd never know it by listening to the CD. The breathtaking sound quality is a credit to restoration engineer Alan Silverman. A number of performances were left off in order to make this fit onto a single disc. What is here is a vintage treasure trove of the then-emerging singer/songwriter movement from the (mostly) American South. What is most important to note is that these performances were recorded for the documentary; they are not licensed recordings from a catalog. Some of the artists included here are no longer with us, but their performances (e.g., Townes Van Zandt's "Waitin' 'Round to Die" and "Pancho and Lefty," Gamble Rogers' "Charlie's Place" and "The Black Label Blues") are chilling and top-notch. Yet, they are in context because these infromal performances are stunning throughout. Some of the truly notable ones are by songwriters who are not well known even now among the general populus -- for example, the great Steve Young, who decided on deeply moving covers of Hank Williams' "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry" along with his own "Alabama Highway". Youngis the guy who wrote "Seven Bridges Road," "Lonesome, On'ry and Mean" (the anthem of Waylon's outlaw movement that didn't include him--though, who was an outlaw long before it became a marketing concept)--and his "Montgomery in the Rain." is also here. Larry Jon Wilson makes an appearance with his deep backwoods "Ohoopee River Bottomland," which is equal parts Tony Joe White and Lightnin' Hopkins, all of it wrapped in Young's swampy Georgia voice and guitar playing. Guy Clark is heard on five cuts, three of them well known, but "Ballad of Laverne and Captain Flint" makes it too. Other writers here include David Allan Coe and John Hiatt, both of whom originally hailed from the Midwest. Hearing Coe in this setting is especially rewarding, almost separated from his bullshit image, just playing and singing his utterly moving songs, especially "I Still Sing the Old Songs," done with only an acoustic guitar. The glimpses listeners get of Rodney Crowell and Steve Earle apart from the slick Nashville production on their own records is especially refreshing. This is a timeless collection that truly stands on its own whether or not you saw the film in 1981 (it is available on DVD thank goodness). It's a no-jive set of songwriters doing what they do best away from the hype, the myth-making, and the self-destructive impulses that have plagued many of them. ~ Thom Jurek
€4.89€6.99

Salsa - Released April 15, 2016 | World Circuit

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Unusual Suspects
When the Buena Vista Social Club album was released to great acclaim in 1997, it revived the careers of quite a few incredibly talented aging Cuban musicians. Like Ibrahim Ferrer, most of those musicians (who had been legendary in the '40s through the '70s) hadn't been performing professionally in decades. With the success of the Buena Vista Social Club, everything changed; they toured the globe, and plans for follow-up albums followed. Ibrahim Ferrer's was the second of what became a line of Buena Vista releases, all hoping to cash in on the success of the first. Ferrer's album is pleasant, the kind of album you could put on during brunch on a sunny morning. The album features many classic Cuban compositions. Original arrangers, musicians, and bandleaders were involved whenever possible. One standout is "Mami Me Gusto," a rolling upbeat tune by the legendary Cuban composer/bandleader Arsenio Rodriguez. On that tune Ferrer is lively and loose, and he is joined by Rodriguez's original pianist, the masterful Ruben Gonzales. The rest of the album is nice, but rarely as inspired or joyous as the original Buena Vista release. This is a much more romantic sounding album and on the right tunes, like "Aquellos Ojos Verdes," they really hit the mark; Ferrer shines and Gonzales sends glistening piano lines cascading down the keys. At age 63-plus, Ferrer was long overdue for a debut album, and as a result the disc communicates a feel of easy satisfaction. If you're looking for classy cocktail party music that will hold the attention of music fans, and won't bother the uninterested, look no further. ~ David Lavin
€31.49
€20.99

Jeux vidéo - Released November 24, 2015 | Brave Wave Productions

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
€14.99
€11.99

Punk - New Wave - Released October 30, 2015 | Beggars Banquet

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
The Pleasure Principle was an important point of departure for Gary Numan, and a significant breakthrough moment in the context of his long and storied career. Released about six months after Replicas, it was an instant commercial success, quickly reaching the dizzy heights of number one in the UK Charts. On this record, his third solo effort (and first under his own name), Numan abandoned guitars completely, instead embracing a more synthetic style of production. The album heralded the purely electronic, distinctly robotic sound that this modern icon has become most famous for today. Numan employed a variety of Moog synthesizers to realise The Pleasure Principle, achieving his trademark sound largely by use of the distinctive ‘Vox Humana’ setting. Throw in a healthy dose of production trickery; including flanging, phasing, layers of reverb, and some solo violin, and you are the rest of the way there! Numan was influenced by the greatest pioneers of electronica - Kraftwerk’s epochal Autobahn ghosts the track ‘Cars’ (the very same synths were used!) – and, subsequently, he influenced a generation of new artists. Numan blazed a trail for Nine Inch Nails’s industrial rock, Afrika Bambaataa’s hip-hop explosion, and even early-2000s club bangers like Basement Jaxx’s immortal ‘Where’s Your Head At?’ A pleasure indeed.
€14.99
€9.99

Country - Released October 16, 2015 | Charly

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
This is the second perfect album Van Zandt cut in 1972, a complement to High, Low and in Between. Together they contain the highest points of his brilliant but erratic career. The Late Great may be a bit stronger, with classics like "Pancho & Lefty," "No Lonesome Tune," and "If I Needed You," but there's not a weak track here. Van Zandt's voice is in top shape, the song selection is superb, and Jack Clement's understated production gives the tunes a timeless quality. He eschews the hokey touches that make parts of Our Mother the Mountain sound corny, opting for a subdued sound that uses light touches of folk, pop, and country music in their arrangements. The set opens with "No Lonesome Tune," one of Van Zandt's more hopeful songs, delivered with mandolin, quiet pedal steel, and piano complementing Van Zandt's poignant vocal. "Sad Cinderella" and the epic "Silver Ships of Andilar" are mysterious ballads with oblique lyrics, open to many interpretations. In the Van Zandt documentary Be Here to Love Me the singer says that his goal is to write songs so peculiar that "nobody knows what they mean, not even me." He succeeds with these two numbers. "Sad Cinderella" could be a song of recrimination to a woman at the end of an affair, or a disillusioned letter to an America caught in the contradictions of the Vietnam War, or perhaps just an exercise in poetic language. Whatever its meaning, Van Zandt's pained vocal and sparse piano fill it with longing and tenderness. "Andilar" is one of the most atypical tunes in Van Zandt's catalog, a five-minute epic of war and betrayal filled with images of sinking ships, icebergs, battle, and death. Acoustic guitar, a wailing female background chorus, and a sweeping orchestral arrangement give it a cinematic feel, and again it could be about Vietnam, some long forgotten European war, or his own inner turmoil. Whatever the meaning, its scope is cinematic and full of Van Zandt's singular poetry. "Pancho & Lefty," Van Zandt's greatest commercial success, has a folk/pop arrangement with mariachi horns coming in on the coda to give it a Mexican flavor. It's the best rendition of the tune Van Zandt ever cut. "If I Needed You" is purely romantic, one of Van Zandt's most understated love songs, simply sung over a bouncy country rhythm. The album's three covers get made over into Van Zandt's own image. Guy Clarke's "Don't Let the Sunshine Fool Ya" uses pedal steel, female backing vocals, and bluesy guitar to deliver a message that's full of ironic humor. Hank Williams' "Honky Tonkin'" is pure country, with Van Zandt's vocals siding up the scale to crack on the high notes just like Hank Sr used to do. "Fraulein" uses a fiddle to add poignancy to Van Zandt's vocals on this post-WWII tune about a GI's impossible love for a German girl. The album closes with the goofy spiritual "Heavenly Houseboat Blues," that sees Van Zandt sailing down the river Jordan in a slowly sinking silver houseboat. He gargles the last verse with a mouth full of water, ending the set on an odd, giddy note. ~ j. poet
€14.99
€11.99

Punk - New Wave - Released October 16, 2015 | Beggars Banquet

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Behind all the Bowie-esque mimicry, the second and final album from Tubeway Army remains a true masterpiece of new wave electronica. Diving straight into the prose of Philip K. Dick, the Gary Numan helmed group scorched Replicas through with science fiction; the man-machine, androgyny, and other related themes all crop up frequently. Released in April 1979, the record was preceded by the hit single Are ‘Friends’ Electric? The track still offers a perfect, synthetic brand of pop; at the heart of which lies Numan’s clear sense of melody and streamlined choruses. Behind the impressive instrumentation, an arsenal of Moog and analogue synthesizers of all kinds, Tubeway Army recorded an album that well and truly marked the dawn of the 1980s. © CM/Qobuz
€25.49
€16.99

Alternatif et Indé - Released October 2, 2015 | Stunvolume

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
For a first attempt, it was a masterstroke… Certainly, Garbage are no longer as fresh as when their first album appeared in 1995. The batch of rock’n’roll was produced by the legendary American Butch Vig (the same Vig who produced Nirvana’s iconic Nevermind) and sung by the brash Scot, Shirley Manson, and held an impressive batch of influences: grunge, metal, punk, shoegazing, pop, electronica, as all fused on this hard disc of formidable melodies. Yet, this disc is not an artificial collage. It is filled with guitar layers a la My Bloody Valentine (Supervixen), and Butch Vig disposed of the overtly funky electro rhythms and keys (as on Queer). And, when the atmosphere relaxes, the more urban Garbage rears its ugly head (Stupid Girl). It is one of the great post-grunge discs that graced the state of rock in the middle of the 1990s. This 20th Anniversary Deluxe Edition includes a grand total of 21 tracks: the original album along with 9 additional rare pieces. © CM/Qobuz
€16.49
€10.99

Alternatif et Indé - Released October 2, 2015 | Stunvolume

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
For a first attempt, it was a masterstroke… Certainly, Garbage are no longer as fresh as when their first album appeared in 1995. The batch of rock’n’roll was produced by the legendary American Butch Vig (the same Vig who produced Nirvana’s iconic Nevermind) and sung by the brash Scot, Shirley Manson, and held an impressive batch of influences: grunge, metal, punk, shoegazing, pop, electronica, as all fused on this hard disc of formidable melodies. Yet, this disc is not an artificial collage. It is filled with guitar layers a la My Bloody Valentine (Supervixen), and Butch Vig disposed of the overtly funky electro rhythms and keys (as on Queer). And, when the atmosphere relaxes, the more urban Garbage rears its ugly head (Stupid Girl). It is one of the great post-grunge discs that graced the state of rock in the middle of the 1990s. This 20th Anniversary Deluxe Edition includes a grand total of 21 tracks: the original album along with 9 additional rare pieces. © CM/Qobuz
€16.49
€10.99

Alternatif et Indé - Released October 2, 2015 | Stunvolume

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
For a first attempt, it was a masterstroke… Certainly, Garbage are no longer as fresh as when their first album appeared in 1995. The batch of rock’n’roll was produced by the legendary American Butch Vig (the same Vig who produced Nirvana’s iconic Nevermind) and sung by the brash Scot, Shirley Manson, and held an impressive batch of influences: grunge, metal, punk, shoegazing, pop, electronica, as all fused on this hard disc of formidable melodies. Yet, this disc is not an artificial collage. It is filled with guitar layers a la My Bloody Valentine (Supervixen), and Butch Vig disposed of the overtly funky electro rhythms and keys (as on Queer). And, when the atmosphere relaxes, the more urban Garbage rears its ugly head (Stupid Girl). It is one of the great post-grunge discs that graced the state of rock in the middle of the 1990s. This 20th Anniversary Deluxe Edition includes a grand total of 21 tracks: the original album along with 9 additional rare pieces. © CM/Qobuz

Pop indé - Released July 17, 2015 | Mégaphone

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Michael Head, former frontman of the Pale Fountains and current co-leader along with his brother John -- who is also a Strand -- of Brit pop outfit Shack, turns in a stellar chamber pop performance with Magical World of the Strands. Head, who is no stranger to either classy, baroque pop or neo-psychedelia, has composed an album of gorgeously illustrated songs that are lushly orchestrated by a standard rock quartet augmented by a flutist (Leslie Roberts) and a string quartet. The result is an album that, while little known, is a classic, a masterpiece of modern chamber pop. Released in 1997, this disc walks the line between the deep, darkly expressionistic chamber work of the Tindersticks and the airy, classically augmented breeze-laden pop of Nick Drake à la Five Leaves Left -- long before the millennial obsession with the latter's work was revived due to a Volkswagen commercial. The disc's first two tracks, "Queen Matilda" and "Something Like You," are striking in their seductive, velvety tenderness. The ghost of Drake is everywhere, floating in and hovering above the strings. In the refrain to "Something Like You," one can even hear his voice in Head's phrasing. The difference, however, is in how Head composes lyrics: he's more economical; he merely illustrates the essence of what he's communicating--be it image or emotion--and leaves the listener to fill in the blanks. The other huge influence on Head and the Strands is Pentangle, with slippery modal folk and rock. This music could have been recorded in the early '70s, but what it conveys is timeless. What reverberates through this album on every track is musical savvy. It's in the lyrical reverie of "X Hits the Spot," with jangling guitars and subtle backbeat. "It's Harvest Time," recalls Dave Cousins and Strawbs with open, ringing 12 strings, and piping, echoplexed flute. The electric-acoustic guitar tradeoff between Michael and James in "Fontilan," contains a melancholic theme inside a spacious mix colored by swelling strings. Throughout this gem showcases compositional class and an aesthetic sensibility at once artful yet completely accessible to anyone with an interest in well-written, -played, -produced, and -sung pop. ~ Thom Jurek

Musique vocale profane - Released June 15, 2015 | Ina Archives

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography